Social Media Book Review: Jab Jab Jab Right Hook by Gary Vaynerchuck

Finding great social media books to use as texts in a social media class can be a challenge. The space is constantly changing and there is so much we need to teach our students.

Personally, I’m always looking. That’s why this summer I read Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World by Gary Vaynerchuck. Here are 2 areas where the book excels.

jab jab jab right hook vaynerchuck

1) Emphasis on the “jab”

The jab in this case is your social content that does not aim to sell or promote a product. It is the content that builds the relationship with the audience. The basic premise of this book is that in order to hit your customer with a “right hook” to knock them down (i.e., get them to buy), you have to set them up with a lot of little jabs. It is these jabs – pieces of content that are native to the platform and speaks to the interests of your followers – that get them to pay attention to you. Gary’s argument, then, is that the reason most people get social media wrong is because they try to advertise on social media. Since everyone hates being advertised to, people don’t pay attention. In other words, most people try to take old approaches from other mediums and apply them to social media.

If, on the other hand, organizations provided value to their followers – via jabs – then their followers wouldn’t mind a little sales or promotional message – right hook – every once in a while.

This is an important lesson we are all seeking to teach our students. I’ve often spoken about things like the “80 20” rule. The boxing analogy makes it tangible for the reader – and I think students will easily relate to this.

So the question becomes, how do you create great jabs that customers are happy to take on the chin? It is this question that the book seeks to address. Vaynerchuck addresses this question with chapters on various social media channels with primary focus on Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

2) Mini “Case Study” Examples

At the end of each chapter is a long list of specific social media posts from various companies, big and small.  Gary deconstructs each social media posting, which is published in full color so you can see it how it would be on the screen. He explains the pros and cons of the post for that social platform. Also, he provides specific insights on how to improve the post. These detailed examples are great for anyone learning how to create better content. The advice is actionable and supporting reasoning is provided. I learned some great pointers from these sections of the book that I had not considered before. And I believe it has helped me create stronger content for myself. And, I’ve incorporated a few of his points into my lecture.

These examples along make the book worth a read. They have a great potential to help students learn how to make better content. In other social media books I’ve read or browsed, I have found a dearth of specific, clear, helpful examples to support what the author is seeking to teach. This is where Gary really adds value to the reader. He takes the time to get into specifics on post after post so that the reader isn’t left with just sweeping claims of what to do.

Most students understand how to make social content – since they create it and are around it all of the time. But my experience is that it can be very difficult to teach students how to make better content. I love this book for this reason!

The Verdict: Would I Use This Book In My Social Media Class?

In short, Yes. However, I didn’t adopt the book this semester. The biggest reason is that the due date for submitting our fall readings was during spring semester. I’ve always hated that policy though I understand the need for that much lead time. But, it tends to stifle my ability to find something new that I love and add it (When I’ve tried to throw a book on the syllabus as a required reading that wasn’t available in the bookstore in the past, students have not been too happy). So I added this book as a recommended read on my syllabus.

Of note, Gary has a “I’m not going to sugar coat it for you” style that is a part of his brand.  I mention this because it may not appeal to all readers. But, I can see a lot of students finding this style appealing as opposed to the more staid writing styles that prevail in most texts that make their way into the classroom.

I would not use this book as a standalone. It doesn’t offer a lot in the areas of analytics, for example. It is a book on how to create content – as the title suggests. So, I would suggest coupling it with other books and readings. In short, Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook is a useful addition for its emphasis on the hows of creating great content and why the advice provided is effective. It is a worthwhile read for both students, professors, and practitioners.

Books I currently use in my Social Media class:

  1. Likeable Social Media by Kerpen – this is a book I have used for several semesters and love. (there is an update version that I have not yet had time to read – the one linked here – that students have told me they really are enjoying).
  2. Your Brand, The Next Media Company by Brito  – this book is a little more challenging of a read for some students. But it is a great book and my second time using it.

What books do you use for your social media class? I’d love to know!

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